Neanderthal man mastered the art of fire

A first direct proof of the ability of Neanderthals to produce fire by striking stones was provided by European archaeologists.

To establish this theory, archaeologist Andrew Sorensen and his colleagues at Leiden University in the Netherlands analyzed several tools dating back 50,000 years from sites in France.

The use of fire was relatively common among Neanderthal men in the Paleolithic, but the means by which they obtained it remained uncertain and were debated.

The general idea was that Neanderthals did not make their own fire, but depended on natural embers caused by lightning.

Andrew Sorensen

“They would have picked up burning sticks to light their own fire, which they let burn at all times by taking them with them when they moved,” says Sorensen.

However, this theory does not stick to reality, says the researcher.

We bring the first direct material proof of a regular and systematic fire production by the Neanderthals.

Andrew Sorensen

Using flint

In fact, archaeologists have found “prehistoric lighters” that were used by Neanderthals to produce fire. These dozens of flint cut on both sides (bifaces) bear traces that seem to indicate that they were used to strike a ferrous ore such as pyrite or marcasite.

One of the techniques to start a fire is to hit a flint against pyrite. Small sparks occur when they fall on dry leaves to create flames.

To the naked eye, we see traces of C-shaped percussion, which allow to deduce the angle and direction with which the biface hit the pyrite.

Andrew Sorensen

In the microscope, the team also discovered streaks and a special wear polish.

The discovery of dozens of bifaces bearing these traces shows that it was “a technology widespread among Neanderthals in this region about 50,000 years ago,” said Andrew Sorensen.

The archaeologist agrees, however, that his analysis of the traces “remains an interpretation”. “I’m sure the debate” around Neanderthal’s ability to fire will “continue”.

The details of this work is published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Ethan Scout

Ethan Scout is still early into his career as tech reporter but has already had his worked published in many major publications including JoySticq and Android Authority.   In regards to academics, Ethan earned a degree in business from Appalachian State University Ethan has passion for emerging technology and covers upcoming products and breakthroughs.

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Ethan Scout

About the Author: Ethan Scout

Ethan Scout is still early into his career as tech reporter but has already had his worked published in many major publications including JoySticq and Android Authority.   In regards to academics, Ethan earned a degree in business from Appalachian State University Ethan has passion for emerging technology and covers upcoming products and breakthroughs.

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